First Time Fit Top Five

Do you remember your first bra fitting? For most of us it was an awkward, embarrassing 10 minutes of our life in front of a total stranger. For others our first bra might have arrived wrapped in a plastic bag and been sat subtly on the end of our bed!

They call it puberty blues for a reason!

But it doesn’t have to be that awkward.

A sports bra is a great option for a first bra for developing girls and often it’s during their sporting or school physical education activities that students first start to feel like they need a bra.

Getting fitted for a sports bra rather than for an everyday bra can help eliminate some of the angst from a situation. This is because you’re purchasing a technical sports product for a noticeable need that will make them focus on feeling more comfortable rather than being focussed on being uncomfortable in some new clothing contraption!

But here are our Top Five Reasons a Sports Bra is a great first time fitting option:

  1. Comfort: They are more likely to be a crop/compression style of product. This can, in some cases, assist not only to support but to minimise the appearance of breasts and provide coverage that feels similar to a bathing suit.

 

  1. Adjustable: There is some great product on the market which will include the straps being adjustable at the front which can allow for breast tissue growth, while still being as supportive as possible.

 

  1. Wire Free: There are often very supportive options that do not have underwire. Underwire is in Sports Bras and everyday bras simply to enhance shape – and there is nothing wrong with wearing it. But for first time bra wearers they can often take some getting used to. Starting in a bra without an underwire can be a great first step.

 

  1. Adaptable: They fit with a student’s lifestyle. Often around the age of a first bra young people are sitting at their desk one minute and running around the next. Sports Bras can be comfortable enough to wear all day, whilst providing support when it’s demanded.

 

  1. Fashion: They come in a great range of colours, and let’s face it, that matters!

 

Most importantly a well-fitting and comfortable bra – whether everyday or Sports – can have a big impact on confidence. Starting out with the right fit and right knowledge can change what can be an awkward experience into an empowering one.

 

Bra Banding Might Fix Your Chafing Woes

It’s all about the banding when it comes to Sports Bras – but even more so for Sports Bras for distance runners.

Almost every runner has experience dreaded chafing somewhere at some point – ooh and the nasty sting in the shower post run!

But avoiding chafing is usually down to a few simple steps.

  1. Make sure your Sports Bra banding is firm.

You don’t want your bra to be rib-crushingly-too-tight-to-breath firm but you do want it firm enough that the band cannot move.

Having a firm band around the rib cage is the number one rule for getting a Sports Bra or any bra fit right. If the band is firm the majority of support will come from the band and it will apply less pressure to the straps on the shoulders. The bra will be more comfortable and more effective at holding breast tissue in place.

If the band is too loose you immediately lose support for breast tissue, place greater pressure on the straps AND increase your risk of chafing – because the band will move around the rib cage. This is especially true of distance runners as they deplete fluids and grams to kilograms of physical weight as they run.

  1. Make sure the Cup is snug.

For all the same reasons as above – if there is any room in the cup you lose support and invite chafing. You want it tight – compressive – but not so much that breast tissue is spilling out the top or that you feel crushed.

  1. Make sure the bra doesn’t sit too high.

As Sports Bras are often ‘’crop’’ style another common chafe point is if the bra sits too high and digs into the tissue above the breasts and slightly in from the arm pits. This is a potential friction point due to arm movement during running. As runners seek higher coverage from a Sports Bra to close vertical escape routes for breast tissue – which we love – sometimes they can sit too high and cause issues.

  1. Wear a breathable, moisture/sweat wicking material.

It might sound simple but the wrong fabric close to the skin can increase the risk of chafing. Cotton based materials for example will become saturated with sweat and lose most of their breathability.

  1. Arm yourself with an anti-chafe product

Sometimes everything you try will not be good enough. Be sure you are well hydrated and arm yourself with an anti-chafe product like Body Glide. It needs to be something that is water based and NOT petroleum based. And if you already have chafing protect it from getting worse with a film dressing.

 

There are some schools of thought that you shouldn’t wear underwire for distance running. In fact this is an entirely individual decision. If a wire is sitting well in the right place and on the right person some runners will find they prefer this as it will assist to encapsulate the breast tissue reducing sweat pooling between the breasts. Others will find the wire will not sit correctly on their sternum and this can cause irritation as they progress into their run and deplete in fluids. Unfortunately, as our bodies have so many variables, this is one thing that can only be determined when tested on the track.

Getting your Sports Bra professionally fitted can help to ensure you’ve ticked as many of the right boxes as you can before you head out to hit the pavement.

 

Regaining Core Strength After Pregnancy

 

By Libby Nuttall, Personal Trainer and She Science Ambassador

So you’ve had your baby, congratulations! Now it’s time to smash a few ab workouts and flatten that mummy tummy, right?! Wrong. On so many levels, wrong.

Pregnancy puts huge strain on your core and pelvic floor and now is the time for rehabilitation, not waist training, ab workouts, or thrashing our bodies at the gym.

Let’s talk a little bit about the core, because there’s lots of misconceptions. Picture a cylinder. The core is like a cylinder, with the diaphragm at the top, pelvic floor at the bottom, the muscles surrounding your spine known as the multifudus, and your deep abdominal muscles, known as your transverse abdominis. Your glutes are a really important piece of the puzzle as well.

What’s not so important right now are your outer abdominals, you know, your six pack muscles. Unlike your transverse abdominis, they have little impact on your general health or strength. So forget about crunches for a while.

So why does pregnancy put pressure on this region? Well imagine a hammock. Now imagine bouncing a bowling ball on the hammock. That’s what pregnancy is like for your pelvic floor. The extra weight and size puts pressure on all of the internal organs, changing the centre of gravity and the muscles we use to walk, stand and move. The stretching of all these muscles during pregnancy leaves them weakened and at risk of injury.

After childbirth is a crucial time for rehabilitation, and looking after your body in this phase will stand you in good stead for future pregnancies and general health and wellbeing, including minimising aches and pains, preventing pelvic organ prolapse or hernia and healing diastisis recti.

Diastisis Recti

The first thing we should identify is whether we have experienced abdominal separation, and how severe it is. Many women experience diastisis recti, so it’s nothing you should worry about and shouldn’t cause you any pain. It’s important to know which exercises to avoid, to help heal the separation or cause further damage. Undiagnosed ab separation can lead to hernia, posture issues, low back pain and incontinence issues.

lib picYou can determine whether you are affected by visiting a physiotherapist or performing this simple test on yourself (I would always recommend a physio after birth anyway!)

Once this is done, it’s time to start thinking about the best ways to regain core strength, and let me tell you right now, it ain’t situps.

In the first few of months after pregnancy we want to avoid exercises which put too much pressure on the outer abdominals such as situps, double leg raises and crunches. It’s also time to back away from the front loading exercises such as planks and push ups.

It seems like you’re not allowed to do anything, right? Don’t worry, this is a short phase in the scheme of things and there is still plenty you can do to regain core strength without those particular exercises. Trust me, your body will thank you down the track.

Here are my top tips for post partum core work. Remember to always focus on controlled, smooth movements, continuous breathing and good posture.

  1. Breathing and engaging exercises. Start your post partum workouts by learning to re-engage your pelvic floor and core. Identify whether you can, in fact, feel your core and floor being turned on and off. Deep breathing exercises are also key in the early stages. Simply lie down and allow your stomach to expand and contract as much as possible while taking deep breaths.
  1. Basic floor work. There’s several ways to activate your core simply by lying down. Before each of these, actively engage your core and continue to breathe normally.

Single leg heel slides – With knees bent and heels close to hips, slide one leg out to straight and return, swap legs

Single leg extensions – With knees bent and heels close to hips, raise one foot upwards and return, swap legs

Pelvic tilt – lying down and place feet up on a chair or fitball. Engage your core and tilt your pelvic back by pressing your lower back into the floor. Hold for five seconds then repeat 10 times.

libpic3

  1. Plank variations. As we talked about above, front loading exercises are best avoided in the early days, but there are still other options for you. Reverse plank and side plank are great. Over a series of weeks and months, progress at your own pace toward regular plank by starting leaning against a wall, then lower onto a chair or fitball. Next, move on to plank on your knees, then do short bursts on your toes.libpic2
  1. Resistance bands – When you’re ready to add some resistance to your training, resistance bands are a fantastic place to start. They provide a low-impact core workout that you can work up to in the post partum phase, just make sure you’ve really mastered points one and two first. There’s dozens of exercises to do with resistance bands, from rows, to posture work and dedicated core work. The bands allow you to work at an appropriate resistance level and gently regain core strength.

By Libby Nuttall, Miracle Months 

libby nuttalLibby is a women’s personal trainer in the Macedon Ranges. When she’s not hanging with her two sons, husband and Weimaraner (a.k.a; the boys), she is running high intensity fitness classes, volunteering as the president of the local playgroup, or working on her range of pre and post natal wellness programs, Miracle Months. Libby had her second son in December 2015 and is loving sharing the journey back to fitness and strength post baby with her social media following. This year she is looking forward to competing in a number of runs and obstacle races. Follow Libby via Miracle Months facebookinstagram. www.miraclemonths.com

Overcoming Adversity + Accepting Change

By Carol Cooke, She Science Ambassador

 

There are three things in life that are certain: death, which none of us want to see; taxes, which none of us like to pay; and change, which most of us dislike.  However change happens every single day of our lives, from the little things to big crisis’ that can hit our lives.

Adversity and change can trigger progress, but unfortunately for most of us all we see are the problems before us and instead of looking beyond the actual problem/crisis we only think in the negative.  When change or adversity occurs it is important to accept that it has happened, believe in yourself and your abilities, and move on.  Look for solutions instead of the negatives and although there will be obstacles along the way, each stumble will help you change the way you tackle the problem.  Your progress will demonstrate that change can work to your advantage.

Adversity and change makes you re-evaluate your life.  We have to understand that things don’t always stay the same and we must become accepting, creative and adept at confronting challenges that are thrown in our way.

A good friend of mine Warren MacDonald taught me that it’s not about ‘what you see’, but ‘how you see it.’  He should know, as he lost both his legs in a hiking accident but has gone on to change the way he sees things and built an incredible life.  What an amazing world this would be if we could all reassess how we see things.  We all experience changes to our life plan, but we have to remember that the actual changes aren’t important; the way we deal with them or ‘how we see them’ is what matters.  We can decide to curl up and die or we can embrace them.  Some of the changes or crisis we face will be good and some will be bad.  Life won’t always be fair but how we deal with those things is what will make the difference.

If you are facing a change or adversity in your life you have to decide if it will be a problem or an opportunity.  Is it a negative or a positive, a limitation or a challenge?  How you view it is up to you.  I tend to lean towards the opportunities, the positives and the challenges and I don’t believe we can accept change without working on it; it is a never-ending process.  A couple of ways that I do on a daily basis is to try something new every day.  This can be as small as smiling at a stranger or just saying ‘G’Day’.

If you are facing change or adversity right now you can also write a sentence outlining the positive outcomes.  Post it somewhere where you will see it each day.  This will help reprogram your brain to think positively about change.  Then, in a week, add another positive outcome to the list, eventually you will have a list of positives that demonstrate that the change is good!

 

By Carol Cooke AM

World Champs TT 2014

A woman that believes that “the greatest pleasure in life is doing what people say you cannot do”, Carol has overcome a serious MS diagnosis to triumph on the world stage at the Paralympics. Carol teaches the world through both example and her regular speaking engagements that “nothing is impossible if we dare to face our fears and believe in ourselves”. Carol hopes to head to Rio 2016 to defend her 1st place position in the T1-T2 Road Time Trial. Follow Carol’s adventures  via her website, facebook orinstagram

 

Panache Sports Bra Stockist Melbourne Australia

Our Sports Bra store, She Science, stocks the Panache Sports Bra in cup sizes D – H.17-RGB-LR-RGB-lr

The Panache Sports Bra is a popular bra amongst our customers. The structured cups not only lift and seperate effectively, but also give a firm hold on breast tissue during activity.

A key feature of the Panache 5021 Sports Bra is the cinch hook at the back that enables the bra to be worn as either a traditional/straight back bra or a racer back. Our customers generally prefer the racer back option for high impact training sessions and the straight back option for longer periods of wear.

Check out our available range of Panache Sports Bras here.

5-RGB-LR-Panache_GG_Sport_Wired_Sports_Bra_5021_Short_5024_Black440Panache Sports Short black

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

By Tish Monahan

Best Bra Fitter Australia Melbourne

 

Tish is the co-founder and director of She Science, a Specialty Sports Bra and Sports Wear store in Melbourne. Tish has completed Advanced Bra Fitting training both locally and internationally as well as tertiary education in biomechanics. She follows the latest research on breast biomechanics and Sports Bra design religiously to ensure that She Science remains the most advanced Sports Bra shopping environment in the world. Tish views her Sports Bra business as a vehicle for her to inspire and enable women of all shapes and sizes to participate actively in life. Find Tish online via @SheScience. 

Breast Feeding + Exercise

By Libby Nuttall

 

There are so many questions running through your mind as a new mum, many of those about breastfeeding. For something so natural, it can actually be pretty hard to get the hang of! Exercise is not only safe, but recommended while breastfeeding. Studies show exercise does not have any long term affect on milk supply or nutrient content.

The benefits of exercise to a breastfeeding mother include enhanced mental health, improved fitness and more energy to cope with the demands of a baby, so now is the time to get active!

Many mums want to get back into their exercise soon after baby has been born, but are nervous about the process. Will my supply be affected? What if I start leaking? How can I tame my “ladies”? It’s all about making it work for you. Here’s my top tips for getting back into it.

DON’T RUSH!

Don’t rush back into high intensity exercise, allow your body to ease back into everything. Some women do find that increasing the intensity too quickly can affect their breastmilk supply, while others say it has no impact whatsoever.

You need to discover what works for you, but easing into exercise is advisable for everyone, even if you exercised right through your pregnancy. If you find noticeable changes in your milk or baby when introducing exercise, cut back and return gradually.

LOOK AFTER NUMERO UNO!

As a new mum, you may be sleep deprived and lethargic. You are also using more energy each day just by breastfeeding. Don’t forget, your supply can be affected by your lethargy, so don’t push it. It’s crucial that you are providing your body with the nourishment it needs, that is, good quality food, sleep and water, so you have the energy to exercise as well as produce milk.

In the early months, I find two to three days of exercise followed by a rest day is a good way to maintain and refill those energy stores.

SUPPORT THOSE MUMMAS!

Invest in a really supportive bra. Whether it be a breastfeeding bra or not, it needs to support your breasts so you can run with ease. Many women say their biggest challenge to overcome when it comes to exercise after baby is figuring out how to manage their breasts, so it’s invaluable to invest well and most of all, make sure it is correctly fitted.

One of my 'breast feeding appropriate' facvourites, the Juno!

One of my ‘breast feeding appropriate’ facvourites, the Juno!

MONITOR BABY’S RESPONSE

There is evidence to suggest that lactic acid can build up in the milk supply during high intensity exercise. Once again, this can be different for all women, so just monitor your baby’s response when feeding. If she doesn’t mind, then continue. If you find bub struggles to feed after a workout, avoid feeding for 90 minutes, when your milk should return to normal.

And remember to change out of your sweaty clothes straight after a workout to avoid infection of the milk ducts.

PRE FEED!

Try to feed your baby before you do exercise. This will not only mean your baby isn’t subjected to a sweaty, salty nipple, but will mean you’re not as full while you’re working out. It can also alleviate any concerns about lactic acid build up.

Before you leave for the run, insert fresh nursing pads into your bra to prevent a mid-run leak!

 

By Libby Nuttall, Miracle Months 

 

libby nuttalLibby is a pre and post natal personal trainer in the Macedon Ranges. When she’s not hanging with her two sons, husband and Weimaraner (a.k.a; the boys), she is running high intensity fitness classes, volunteering as the president of the local playgroup, or working on her new range of pre and post natal wellness programs, Miracle Months. Libby had her second son in December 2015 and is loving sharing the journey back to fitness and strength post baby with her social media following. This year she is looking forward to competing in a number of runs and obstacle races. Follow Libby via Miracle Months facebookinstagram.

 

Berlei High Performance Sports Bra | Product Review

By Carol Cooke AM, Gold Medal Paralympian and She Science Ambassador

 

HP white New sI have always loved the Berlei Bras and have been purchasing them for a number of years now.  So when I went into She Science in search of a few more it was no suprise I ended up in the Berlei bras again.  Ordinarily I would have chosen the same bra I had always been in, but was pointed in the direction of the Berlei High Performance Bra by Tish.

I was a bit confused at first as it looked more like an everyday bra than a Sports Bra!  But I was assured that it was in fact a supportive Sports Bra, so I decided to give it a try.  From the moment I put it on the comfort and support I felt was fantastic and was thrilled that it looked great too!

 

I’m pretty active during the day even when I’m not training and I have found that this Berlei bra is great for wear at any time and as it has the look and feel of a normal bra I have been wearing it under even my work clothes.

As I am fairly busty I don’t like straps that are thin and seem to cut into your shoulders but with the High Performance Bra there are nice wide straps that sit perfectly and provide great support.  The sides of the bra are fairly wide so also give you that “tucked in” feeling…nothing bulging out under my arms!

This bra is perfect for wear at any time of the day, whether you are running, cycling, going to the gym or just want a bit of extra support under your t-shirts, work clothes or evening wear!

By Carol Cooke AM

World Champs TT 2014

A woman that believes that “the greatest pleasure in life is doing what people say you cannot do”, Carol has overcome a serious MS diagnosis to triumph on the world stage at the Paralympics. Carol teaches the world through both example and her regular speaking engagements that “nothing is impossible if we dare to face our fears and believe in ourselves”. Carol hopes to head to Rio 2016 to defend her 1st place position in the T1-T2 Road Time Trial. Follow Carol’s adventures  via her website, facebook or instagram

 

 

 

Moving Comfort Juno for new Mum’s

By Libby Nuttal, founder of Miracle Months

 

After the birth of my first son in 2013, I couldn’t wait to get back into training and was eager to pound the pavement. But alas! Those lovely little B cup beauties had grown to the size of a grapefruit!

Layered up with a random variety of sports crops and feeding bras, I began my journey back to fitness; sometimes not-so-delicately pulling them up to feed my son on my run! Not only was I uncomfortable and unsupported, I felt like I couldn’t do the sorts of training I wanted to.

Enter the Moving Comfort Juno.

Breast feeding Sports BraSecond time around I would make no such mistakes. The Juno has the high coverage and support needed for high intensity exercise as well as running, but has the added functionality and ease of feeding on the go.

Despite feeling like you’re wrestling an alligator to get it on, once over your head it feels like a suit of armour, giving you the confidence to run, jump, ride your way to fitness. There’s no way those bad boys will stop you now!

Rather than a clip mechanism to help feed, the straps are adjustable at the front, making it super easy to feed out in public, no alligator-wrestling required. The front adjusting straps also mean you can pull them a little tighter when you’re more empty after a feed, so you’re always fully supported no matter what size.

Why would you need a bra you can feed in? I often take my sons on my walks, runs or workouts in the park, when a crying baby means a quick pit-stop. Or sometimes my workouts go a little longer than expected and I come back to a hungry bub who wants a feed then and there.

As mums we take the chance to workout whenever and wherever we can. Gone are the days of hitting the gym whenever we please or dashing out for a run anytime of the day. So it’s good to know there is a bra, in a range of fabulous colours, that can support me whenever I can squeeze in my workouts.

I recommend visiting She Science to be properly fitted for the Juno, you need just the right fit to give the ladies the support they need 😉

By Libby Nuttal

libby nuttalLibby is a pre and post natal personal trainer in the Macedon Ranges. When she’s not hanging with her two sons, husband and Weimaraner (a.k.a; the boys), she is running high intensity fitness classes, volunteering as the president of the local playgroup, or working on her new range of pre and post natal wellness programs, Miracle Months. Libby had her second son in December 2015 and is loving sharing the journey back to fitness and strength post baby with her social media following. This year she is looking forward to competing in a number of runs and obstacle races. Follow Libby via Miracle Months facebook & instagram.

A guide to returning to training after a break

By Catherine Allison,  Triathlete, Oseopath + She Science Ambassador

 

Catherine Allison, Triathlete + Osteopath

Catherine Allison, Triathlete

As I write “February” on my client notes I can’t help but wonder where on earth did January go? While I’m not one for making New Years Resolutions I do know a number of people who have recently admitted they have decided to re start 2016 in February – and I’m full of support! It is so easy to get caught up in the holiday spirit and when the reality of life sets back in you realise it’s been almost a full month since you worked normal hours and completed your exercise regime like clockwork. So how do you get back into exercise again after an extended break? Here are a few tips to make sure you don’t have to re make your resolution again in March 😉

 

 

  1. Start small – don’t expect to be able to take up where you left off in December 2015. It doesn’t take long for fitness to drop and for our motivation to workout to go with it. Don’t set unrealistic workouts for your first few weeks back or you will end up feeling depressed when they don’t go to plan. Start with 5-10minutes a day; Exercise without your beloved Garmin or Heart Rate monitor; but most importantly just enjoy being out there again.
  1. Set a goal – summer in Melbourne is one of the best times to find a fitness goal as there is an event on most weekends. It doesn’t need to be a big goal or a race you want to win: simply having a date set for your return is enough to kick start the motivation.
  1. Find a fitness buddy – It is very easy to snooze the alarm if there is no one holding you accountable. Chances are your friends are in the same boat as you after the holiday period and simply having someone to meet is motivation enough to get out of bed. And lets me honest, there is nothing more enjoyable than taking a friend (or furry) friend for a well deserved post workout coffee.
  1. Mark it in your diary – A wise man once said “if you fail to plan, you plan to fail”. If you write down in advance on paper (or in your phone) the exercise you plan to complete with a time frame, you are more likely to stick to your routine. Deciding its time to exercise isn’t enough – set some short term goals for each week and enjoy ticking them off as you go.
  1. Make it enjoyable – exercise should be fun and not a chore. For exercise programs to work they need to be something you enjoy or, even better, look forward to completing. Choosing “running” because you heard it’s good for fat burning isn’t going to cut it in a few months when it gets colder and you lose motivation. Find something that makes you tick and stick to it. Life is supposed to be fun.
  1. Dress for it – with the post Christmas Sales lingering it is the perfect time to reward yourself as you tick off each goal. So if you need the extra motivation why not find some new exercise gear to make you feel excited about getting out and about again!  You are far more likely to go out and exercise if you have some new threads and don’t pull on your 3 year old baggy T-shirt from the bottom of the drawer.
  1. Don’t be hard on yourself – coming back from a break for exercise is tough, even for an elite athlete. It is easy to be critical of yourself and to feel despondent when you realise you aren’t where you were a few months ago. Remember that conditioning takes time – there is no quick fix: each day you increase your program you are one step closer to your goal and feeling how you did at your peak.

Remember that the things you do today will show in the weeks to come – sadly we cannot snap our fingers and be back to full fitness or goal weight, so in the meantime, slow down and enjoy the process. Take time to remember why it is you enjoy exercising, make some new friends to keep you company, set some goals in place for the year, and reward the small changes you make along the way. And within no time at all you will be back to your routine and feeling fabulous.

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Catherine is a fierce competitor in the Australian Triathlon community. Her distance of choice is the Ironman 70.3, but you’ll find her on Sprint and Olympic distance courses too. When she isn’t working on her 16 hours of training a week Catherine works with athletes of all levels clinically as an Osteopath. In 2015 Catherine was named the Victorian Female Athelte of the Year by Triathlon Australia. She has her aims set high for another huge year in 2016. Follow her progress via her instagram or review her clinic details here.

Do I need underwire in my Sports Bra?

One of the most common questions we get in store is centered around underwire… Is it better to have underwire or go wire-free?

Naturally, there is no short answer. But I’ll talk you through some of the facts, so that you can be well informed when buying your next Sports Bra. Then, we’ll hear from one of our customers and now She Science Ambassadors, Linda, on her experience going from an underwire to a non-underwire Sports Bra.

Firstly you should know that underwire is put in to a bra for shape, not support. The job of the underwire is to result in a round shaped breast. It is not built in to a bra to lift the breast or stop bounce, these two things will come from the materials and pattern cutting of the bra.

We believe that women are commonly advised in change rooms that underwire is more supportive, which is why there are so many misconceptions about it’s role.

Traditionally, many non-underwire bras have relied on the compression method to offer support or stability, which means they haven’t always been synonymous with a great shape. This has resulted in mainly the larger busted women not enjoying the product.

Nowdays many of the industry leading brands that are putting extensive research into the design and development of their Sports Bra products are not using underwire in their garments, and are producing highly supportive garments with great shape.

One short cut that we see many brands on the market taking is merely adding Sports fabric to their everyday underwire bras and marketing them as Sports Bras. So, like many women have been left underwhelmed by non-underwire Sports Bras, this too has led to much disappointment in many of the underwire Sports Bras on the market today.

We encourage our customers to have an open mind to trying both underwire and non-underwire bras in store. This will give them the opportunity to see which they prefer, and 9/10 their decision is then made on the fit and how they feel in the bra rather than whether it does or doesn’t have underwire.

When discussing the role of underwire it is also important for us to consider ‘security’. If someone has been in underwire all their adult life then there can be a certain security that comes with having it there. To remove underwire can feel so unusual that it is immediately unpleasant for the wearer. This is undeniable, and is a real factor for some women.

When we first met Linda in store we had an interaction that is common in store. Here is her story, in her words below:

Two years ago I found myself at She Science in Kew, the big boobed girls dream in support, every good brand, size and a diverse range of styles (including colours!). 2015-02-SheScience_Shoot-IMG_9370

This visit had me trying on every underwired bra in the shop, which was my initial choice.
If you’ve been to She Science you will know there are treadmills and cameras to assess the bras if you want to use the service. I was eventually encouraged to try some non-underwire options that the bra fitter may thought work best for me given my feedback on the first bras I had tried.  I was a bit apprehensive about this idea as I had always thought without underwire there would be no support. 

 

After trying a few different brands of non-wired bras I found that I felt super secure and each of them supported me. Plus, the video assessment backed up what I was feeling.  I had to try the wired ones back on to make sure. I then did the t-shirt test to ensure no mono boob and the girls still looked great and felt supported.

Now, for me, while I’ll definitely keep an open mind to new options, I won’t be going back to underwire Sports Bras unless they can provide the same support and comfort as the non-underwired bras I wear at the moment.

We love that Linda wanted to share this story, as it is quite a typical occurance for us in store. But it is important to understand that it can work the other way too!

By Tish Monahan

Customer experience by Linda Lewis, She Science Ambassador 2015

 

Best Bra Fitter Australia Melbourne

 

Tish is the co-founder and director of She Science, a Specialty Sports Bra and Sports Wear store in Melbourne. Tish has completed Advanced Bra Fitting training both locally and internationally as well as tertiary education in biomechanics. She follows the latest research on breast biomechanics and Sports Bra design religiously to ensure that She Science remains the most advanced Sports Bra shopping environment in the world. Tish views her Sports Bra business as a vehicle for her to inspire and enable women of all shapes and sizes to participate actively in life. Find Tish online via @SheScience.