Monthly Archives: December 2017

True Endurance Sports Bras Do Exist

After my professional fit by the Team at She Science I discovered the Anita Active Dynamix Star X-back and although I have been tempted and tried other sports bras – this one remains my favourite.

0658_51562Before finding the Dynamix I always got nasty chafing across my back and under my breasts after a triathlon or Ironman event.

Given you start in the water then head on a ride and a run I had thought chafing was just inevitable.

After racing with the Dynamix for the first time I didn’t chafe.

It is awesome. It’s a true endurance sports bra! I also use it for my F45 Training and even on the h ottest Melbourne days whilst training in a stuffy shed I can rely on the Dynamix.

I find it really easy to get into and out of – which is a plus when you have any type of arthritic condition and especially when your body is swollen and sweaty from exercise.

$_1It is also one of the few sports bras that give your breasts shape as well as support! If you are a person that likes to have a flat tight chest whilst exercising then this may not be the bra for you but if this is not a concern then I recommend it.

This shape also allows you to wear it as an everyday bra if you are trying to avoid washing multiple items or packing another bra for your evening workout.

The straps are easily adjustable from the front!

The colours are a combination of subtle and funky! I have both a Peacock and Black one which I find blends well with my tri suit and gym gear.dyn black back

The fabric is soft and breathable and really durable. I have had my bra for over a year now and it still looks like brand new and I would wash it at least three times a week. I also find that this style of fabric allows for quick drying.

The other great thing about this bra is it doesn’t matter if you are a 16D or 12C (available A-G, 10-18) this bra looks great and you are completely supported, giving you the confidence to achieve whatever it is you set out to achieve!

13173804_10153781682415547_845512458671438348_n (002)By Sonia Dunne

Sonia is an accomplished Ironman and Triathlete who has an unstoppable approach to life. She is also a She Science Ambassador. You can follow Sonia @sonia_D2277


Tackling big goals and motivation with routine

Time. Motivation. Fatigue. Boredom. Pain. Kids. Work. Time. Money. Life. Rain. Cold. Heat. Humidity. Time. Life. Time.

There are so many perceived barriers to staying fit and healthy. Whether it be achieving the recommended 30 minutes or 10,000 steps a day, or training towards a bigger goal.

Urban X overIf you want something done, give it to a busy person.

I am an elite ultramarathon runner.

But I am also a full time Occupational Therapist.

And a body pump instructor.

And a recreational running coach.

And a PHd student.

And a fiancé, a daughter, a sister and a friend.

Sure, sometimes it’s really exhausting. But it’s even more exhausting if I get out of routine.  Where there’s a will, there’s a way; it’s just a big game of Tetris.


So, how do you avoid these obstacles? How do you stay motivated and give yourself the best chance of achieving your goals?

  • Make it part of your schedule. Put a schedule on the fridge so that the rest of the family can see that this is YOUR time.
  • Put yourself first. This may be easier said than done, but if you always leave yourself until last you’ll never get things done.
  • Do your exercise in the morning. Get out everything you need the night before. Jump out of bed and go. No thinking. You’ll be grateful when it hits 5pm and you can go straight home.
  • Mix it up: cross train. Go to the gym, ride a bike, do a group fitness class. I’ve been rock climbing recently for something totally different.
  • Get a coach: make yourself accountable to something other than your discipline.  This also helps you know what to do.
  • Organise morning runs or gym sessions with friends: again, making yourself accountable.Kellie East Timor July 2016
  • Surround yourself with positive people that share similar interests.
  • Take the family to ParkRun.
  • Some days, you really don’t want to head out in the rain. I get it. Always have a bag in the car ready for a trip to the gym on the way home just in case.
  • Get the kids to ride beside you whilst you run.
  • Take the dog! Double the purpose.
  • Buy a new outfit! It’s always more motivating to train when you’re looking goo. 🙂
  • Wear the right gear, have everything on hand just in case. The rain’s not so bad if you wear a hat and a raincoat.

If you’re training for something longer it can get more difficult with increased time requirements and motivation levels.

  • Remember the end goal.
  • Remember WHY you are doing this.
  • Take a trip away. The kilometers tick over so much more quickly in a new place.
  • Get out early so that you can still be done by lunch time.
  • Know that it’s ok to have a sleep in from time to time. Listen to your body and mix things up.
  • Take a train or get dropped off somewhere and run back. I find one direction runs much easier to deal with mentally.

Most importantly, never forget to stick with a general ROUTINE.

Happy Training!

By Kellie Emmerson

Kellie Emmerson She Science head shot 2014Placing 5th in the world in the 2017 UTMB (Ultra Trail du Mont-Blanc), 2016 Australian Trail Champion, Kellie Emmerson is a She Science Ambassador and serial ultra-marathon podium finisher.  Kellie professionally works as an Occupational Therapist, Running Coach and Body Pump Instructor. You can follow Kellie on facebook and on Instagram @kelemmo. 

Ovarian Cancer: Detection and Support

When I was growing up it was more of a rarity to know someone who had cancer. Nowadays it’s a rare if you don’t know multiple people who have been touched by this ever prevalent disease.

For me, it was my mum.

Mum was diagnosed with Stage 3 Ovarian Cancer (which means it had spread beyond the ovaries) in 2004 and sadly died two years later.

CWSF4 (002)She was an extremely caring and thoughtful person, a passionate mother, loving wife, generous friend and a dedicated nurse. Mum was born and raised in Bendigo, Victoria. She graduated from St Vincent’s Hospital in Melbourne in 1972 and completed her midwifery studies at the Mercy Maternity Hospital in 1973. Mum ended up ”walking the wards” for 37 years.

Unfortunately, as there are still no early detection tests for Ovarian Cancer – and there is a lack of symptoms in the early stages of the disease, many women are diagnosed when the tumours have spread, making it harder to treat.

This means that the lack of survivors can’t share their cancer journey and advocate to make others more aware.

Also, due to the lack of training in the area of gynaecological cancers (cancers of the female reproductive system), many women are treated as a general cancer patient rather than with specialised care.

My two older sisters, Amy and Jo, myself and two of Mum’s dear friends Marita and Janet, thought women needed specialised support on their cancer journey.

CWSF2So we established the Catherine Wotton Scholarship Fund. Our initial target to set up the fund was $100,000 (yes, my jaw dropped too when I heard this was our target!). We achieved this through various functions, breakfasts, golf tournaments, major sponsors, a now annual Cath Wotton Cup football match, bake sales, sausage sizzles, raffles and the greatly appreciated support of our generous network of friends. The comforting part is we now know this scholarship will be sustainable long into the future.

CWSF3 (002) CWSF1 (002)The scholarship provides registered nurses the opportunity to undertake further study and training in the area of gynaecological and especially ovarian cancers. The aim is to address the current shortage of gynaecological nurses, so that vulnerable women are supported and receive specialised care throughout their cancer journey.

Since 2014 the Scholarship Fund has had four recipients doing remarkable things for women with gynaecological cancers. You can see more about what our past recipients have achieved at our website.

It also aims to raise awareness of gynaecological cancers amongst women in the community.

One woman dies every 10 hours from Ovarian Cancer.

The ideal is for an early detection test to become readily available. This would enable women in the future to add a routine Ovarian Cancer test to their habitual pap smear or breast mammogram enhancing their chances of diagnosing it in its early stages. Until then, hopefully with the help of our scholarship fund, women will get specific care to treat their gynaecological cancer.

If you would like further information about this scholarship please visit our website

Images: 1: Lou Wotton and her Mum Cath. 2: The Eastern Devils donning teal jumpers for the Annual Cath Wotton Cup. 3: Cath Wotton Fund logo. 4: The team that established the Cath Wotton Fund (from left) Amy, Janet, Jo, Marita and Lou.  


LouBy Lou Wotton

Lou is a 2017 Collingwood AFLW player, accomplished Ironman and triathlete. Lou is a She Science Ambassador and you can follow her on Instagram @wotto19.